Nov
25
2016
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    Primary PR
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White Ribbon Day

White Ribbon Day and Silent Tears

Domestic violence is a hidden epidemic, with 1 in 3 women having experienced physical and/or sexual violence perpetrated by someone known to them, and one in four children exposed to domestic violence. As Australia recognises White Ribbon Day on Friday November 25th to raise awareness of domestic and family violence, a new photographic exhibition from internationally renowned photographer Belinda Mason – Silent Tears – aims to provoke a national conversation about the serious levels of violence endured by women and girls with disability in Australia.

Since 1998, Belinda Mason’s work has been oriented around subjects traditionally considered taboo, dealing with difficult subject matter such as body image, disability and sexuality. Supported by artists Dieter Kiernan (video) and Margherita Coppolino (documentary photography), Silent Tears reveals twenty Australian women’s haunting stories of disability and violence using saturated water to symbolise the streams of tears these survivors have silently endured. Each participant has either experienced violence because they have a disability, or has acquired an impairment, as a result of violence.

Silent Tears will be on display at the MAMA from Thursday 24th January 2016 until Sunday 1st January 2017. Primary Communication is a proud supporter of White Ribbon Day, and a proud sponsor of the Silent Tears exhibition.

This year, White Ribbon Day is held November 25th. For more information or to donate, visit the official White Ribbon Australia website. To learn more about the Silent Tears exhibition, please visit the official website here.

Trigger Warning: This exhibition includes depictions and some graphic accounts of violence towards women. If you require support please contact 1800 737 732 to access counselling delivered by qualified, experienced professionals 24-hours a day, seven days a week, from the National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service. www.1800respect.org.au